Osmanthus Wolfberries Jelly

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Weather in Singapore is really humid! People are falling sick with flu virus and heatiness. Thus, I decided to make this to cool ourselves down! …. In chinese restaurant, especially dim sum places, you will see this on the menu under dessert. It meant to be served cool. 

So osmanthus is healthy and I did not add in any other fragance to make it tasteful. I bought the jelly premix, no flavour. The premix has a strawberry flavour, but i guess it will make it weird with osmanthus so I did not use that. 

This is how it looks like. I follow the instructions at the back of the packaging, but I am sure any premix can be used, as long as there are instructions provided.

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It is said that osmanthus prevent cough and phlegm.

Okay! now for the recipe… adapted from here

Ingredients

  • 1 packet of pre-sweetened konnyaku jelly powder (mine is 250g)
  • water (according to the konnyaku jelly powder box instructions; mine requires 1250ml)
  • dried osmanthus flowers 桂花 (1 to 1.5 tsp for every 400ml water)
  • 2 tsp wolfberries soaked in water until puffy; drained

Tools

  • jelly moulds

Directions

  1. In a pot, add water and bring to a boil. When water is boiling, lower heat and then add osmanthus flowers. Simmer for a short few minutes (roughly 2 minutes).
  2. Add konnyaku jelly powder. Stir until the powder is fully dissolved. Off the flame.
  3. Add 2-4 wolfberries to each jelly mould, then pour the jelly solution prepared in step 2 to fill each mould. Let the jelly cool down a bit in room temperature and chill in fridge until the jelly is set.

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You have to do it fast after switching off the flame as the jelly will slowly get solidify at room temperature. Hope you guys like this one!

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Swirl Green Tea Mooncake

Hello! As lantern festival is around the corner, I decided to make mooncakes! I love the swirls and the end product! but it is tedious to make it! I will try again next year and hopefully it turns out to be better!! =)

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Before baking, it was like this :

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Recipe :

Sweet Potato Fillings (~20 balls)

300g sweet potato (400 – 500g when unpeeled)

1/4 cup milk

2 oz butter

1/4 cup sugar

1/2 tsp salt

Boil & mash potato, add rest of ingredients & mix to paste. Roll into balls.

Moon Cake Dough (A) & (B)

Water Dough (A)

200g all purpose flour

28g icing sugar

Pinch of salt

80g cold butter

80g water

Rub-in method (ball should not stick to hand)

Cover and set aside for 20 minutes

Oil Dough (B)

180g all purpose flour

Pinch of salt

90g oil

1/2 tsp green tea powder (originally it was pandan essence)

Melting method (well in center)

Cover and set aside for 20 minutes

1. Preheat oven 185 degree celcius

2. Divide A & B into equal balls

3. Take A & wrap B into it

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4. With the sealed side facing up roll into rectangle

5. Roll up like a cyclinder, roll again into thin strip

6. Roll again.

7. Cut cyclinder in the middle into 2 pieces

8. With the cut side facing down, flatten the dough making the edges slightly thinner than center

9. Wrap filling. Pinch to seal

10. Bake for 30 minutes until top and bottom show brown

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Steamed Cod Fish

Does this look appetizing enough? haha…Image

the cod fish is sooo sweet and delicious! really a chinese delicacy!

A closer look :

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Recipe:

Ingredients

  • 1 thick slice of Fresh Cod Fish Steak (About 1 inch thick)
  • 2 slices Ginger 
  • a dash of pepper

For the Sauce 

  • 1 tbsp Light Soy Sauce
  • 1 tsp Rock Sugar (You could use normal sugar if you don’t have rock sugar)
  • 1 tbsp Water
  • 1 tbsp Hsao Xing Wine 

For Garnishing 

  • 3 bulbs of garlic, finely chopped.
  • 1 tbsp Cooking Oil
  • some spring onions, cut into 1 inch length

Method

  1. Clean fish, pat dry. Place ginger on a steaming dish, place fish on top.
  2. Bring water in the steamer to a boil and steam fish over high heat for 6 minutes. 
  3. While the fish is steaming half way, heat sauce ingredient in a pot and bring to a boil.
  4. Remove fish from the steamer, pour away the steaming liquid .
  5. Add a dash of pepper and drizzle sauce over.
  6. Fry chopped garlic with oil in another pan until golden brown. Don’t burnt it.
  7. Pour the hot garlic oil over, garnish with golden brown garlic and spring onions. Serve!

Note 1 :  The purpose of ginger (or sometimes we used spring onions) slides under the plate is to provide ventilation to the underside of the fish and or avoiding the skin sticking on the plate. But of course, it gives better flavor to the dish in whole. 

Note 2 : There is a delicate balance between perfectly cooked fish and overcooked fish. First of all, remember the principle of residual heat. A pan will hold heat when it’s removed from the heat source, continuing to cook the food for several minutes. For best results, cook fish until it is almost done, then remove the pan from the stove. Let it stand for about 1 or 2 minutes before serving. I know, waiting is really torturing. 

The criteria we go with is that the meat still has a tinge of red but the meat comes off the bone easily with chopsticks or a fork. If the meat sticks to the bone then it is under cooked  If you overcooked your fish, the texture will turn harder and not as tender as what you expect. Different fish size requires different steaming time. I’m not sure about others, but to me, my fish steamed nicely according to below timing. Fish must be in room temperature.

  • 400g Fish = 6 to 7 minutes
  • 450g Fish = 7 to 8 minutes
  • 500g Fish = 8 to 9 minutes
  • 600g Fish = 9 to 10 minutes

Recipe reference : http://annieliciousfood.blogspot.sg/2012/07/hong-kong-style-steamed-cod-fish.html

Siew Mai

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Craving for some siew mai at late last night. So I decided to make these for supper! but ended up to be breakfast instead. It tasted so yummy! One of the all time favorites and easy to make dish! =)

Recipe
– 200g minced pork 
– 300g prawns (shelled, deveined and chopped into small bits so that you can still chew it when cooked)
– spring onions
– some garlic
– diced chinese mushrooms (soaked and softened)
– 2 tbsp soy sauce
– splash of Huatiao wine (can do without it)
– splash of sesame oil
– dash of pepper
– 1 beaten egg (I only used about 1/3 of it to add moisture)
– dumpling wrappers (the thin, round ones)
– Tobiko for garnishing (I replaced it with red carrots which I chopped into small bits for decorations)

1. Mix everything up, except the Tobiko. Using a 1-tbsp spoon, measure out meatballs of uniform size and place in centre of dumpling wrappers. Mine were all 1 heaped tbsp.

2. Wrap and press firmly around each Siew Mai.

3. Seal the top with some egg wash.

4. Place the Siew Mai onto a bamboo steamer (or a plate that has been lined with parchment paper). Spray water to moisten the skin.

5. Steam on high for about 8mins. Do not overcook, or the meat will be tough. Top each Siew Mai with Tobiko and serve immediately.

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this is a recipe I read online, thanks!